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Shakespeare teaching ideas Performing Shakespeare for kids

Character Line Quantities for Playing With Play Books

Over the years, I have taught EVERY single one of our plays, most of them multiple times, and some of them at least 20 times…. (Hamlet, Midsummer, R&J, Caesar, Macbeth…). But, one of the best tools for me to use is the Character Line Quantities spreadsheet to help me with casting.

A teacher asked me recently, “why don’t you share that?” Which I gladly did. But it hit me, why don’t I share this with EVERYONE?

There’s nothing like casting a play. Trying to figure out dynamics of who can synergize with whom; what characters will pull the most out of which kids; more seasoned kids get more lines; a kid’s last show of their school career – do they get the lead? Did I give too many lines to a novice actor?

That last question sometimes worries me… as some parts may seem small (Friar Lawrence in R&J) Yet are one of the bigger parts. (2nd most lines in that play) And, in many of my plays, many actors get 2 or even 3 parts to play. (Did I give too many lines with multiple parts?)

So, a while back, I created a Character Line Quantities sheet that helps me cast my shows. Well, it’s a tool I figure all casting directors could use, so, please see the link below!

Each play has its own tab on the bottom. If you don’t see a play, scroll to the left and right. And, if something’s missing, just contact me and I’ll work on getting it fixed!

Enjoy!

Download the Character Line Quantities sheet

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By brendan kelso

Brendan is the main creative source and author behind Playing With Plays and the infamous Shakespeare for Kids series. You can typically find him inventing by day, playing with his family by night, and writing by very late night.

2 replies on “Character Line Quantities for Playing With Play Books”

Hey Kathy, we don’t have this info in the book because we have found that kids argue over the line counts and it frustrates directors and parents! It tends to be counter-productive! Sorry about that!

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